Tigh Bhisa Blackhouse

High quality self-catering accommodation in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides


Welcome  Facilities  Virtual Tour  Getting here  About the island  Booking  FAQs  Contact us
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As can be seen from these photos, the Outer Hebrides, or Western Isles, are a spectacular combination of land, sea and inland fresh water. Superb stretches of clean sand beaches, wild flower meadows, open moorlands, rugged cliffs and coastlines, and high mountains. All combine to attract a vast variety of bird and animal life. The islands are protected by many environmental designations for sealife, birdlife, or land types.
The Outer Hebrides are unsurpased in their beauty and diversity of natural
landscapes and species. Few places match its abundance of peaceful, unspoilt and natural habitats. Fewer still combine this with such a rich cultural tradition and human history. The Hebridean culture is rich and colourful historically. The Neolithic settlers of over 6000 years ago were the first communities, evidenced by the islands' fascinating and well-preserved archaeology.


The most famous and mysterious monument is perhaps the standing stones of Callanish in the shape of a Celtic cross - older than Stonehenge and predating the Egyptian pyramids by 1000 years. As the home ground of the clan Macdonald of the Isles, or the Macleods of Lewis, the Hebrides is one of the best genealogy reserach centres in the UK. The diaspora of Gaels that is now scattered around the globe use this resource to follow their roots back home.


The people of the Outer Hebrides preserve a rich and vibrant Gaelic culture
in the modern world. It is the true heartland of the Gaels and the Gaelic language. Traditional music lives on, as do modern blends drawing on Celtic roots. The Ceolas music school, the Hebridean Celtic Festival, the traditional music course in the Uists are just some of the musical opportunities available, though the list of cultural events is a very long one. Please visit the tourist board for more information.


Guided walks and tours are easily booked when you arrive, as are boat trips, fishing, canoeing and much more. Follow this link to Adventure Hebrides web site has lots of stuff on where to go and who to do it with. The site also has information on arts and cultural events. Adventure Hebrides can help book activities. The excellent Visit Hebrides web site has information on genealogy, walking, bird watching and wildlife, outdoor activities and water sports, golf, cycling, fishing and cultural events.


When not relaxing in Tigh Bhisa, use it as a base to get even closer to nature: a boat trip to spot whales,
dolphins, seals or puffins, or a guided walk to see otters, buzzards or deer. Or if you like an adrenalin rush you can try out our surfing, or power boating. The Hebrides also offers some of the world's best sea kayaking, unexplored sea cliff climbing, and World Heritage diving.
 

About the island